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Welcome Becca Nelson, JRBP's new tour coordinator and scheduler

All of us here at Jasper Ridge are happy to announce that Becca Nelson is joining us as the new tour coordinator and scheduler. Becca is a graduate of the BIO/ESYS 105 class (’19), an active member of the docent community and an undergraduate researcher in Stanford’s Department of Biology. She will be assisting us in managing our busy schedule for the winter and spring quarters of 2020.  Read below to get to know Becca, including one of her many hidden talents and one very interesting fact.

Name: Becca Nelson

Major: Ecology and Evolution

Minor: Creative Writing 

I'm from Lincolnshire, IL, a small suburb of Chicago.

From Becca:

“I first learned about Jasper Ridge when my frosh dorm went on a field trip there! Toward the end of freshman year, I started collecting data on oak trees at Jasper Ridge for my honors thesis with Rodolfo Dirzo. Jerry Hearn, another docent, has been helping me collect this data. I decided to take BIO 105 because I wanted to learn more about the social-ecological history of Jasper Ridge. BIO 105 introduced me to new perspectives and new ways of studying relationships between people and the natural world. BIO 105 provided me with an interdisciplinary, place-based lens through which I could better understand the world around me.“

Becca’s hidden talents and fun facts:

  • One goal I have is to add more bird species to my birding life list!
  • My hidden talent is baking chocolate chip cookies!
  • One thing most people do not know about me is that I know the lyrics to the entire Les Misérables soundtrack by heart. 

Becca is also an accomplished undergraduate researcher. Last summer, Becca’s undergraduate research was accepted by the Ecological Society to America to be presented in the 2019 annual meeting in Louisville, KY.. You can learn more her research titled “Climate and allometry explain variation in wood density in California trees and shrubs” by reading her abstract.

Becca presented her undergraduate research project during the Ecological Society of America 2019 annual meeting in Louisville, KY.